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The NO MÁS Study

“…somebody has to take the leadership and begin bringing awareness of this situation…and then we take the responsibility as a Latino community and say we’ve got to do something about it because look at the numbers.”

— U.S. BORN LATINO, ATLANTA

The NO MÁS Study, conducted by Lake Research Partners, is a groundbreaking, in-depth study of domestic violence and sexual assault in the U.S. Latino community.

Among the key findings:

  • More than half of the Latin@s (56%) in the U.S. know a victim of domestic violence, and one in four (28%) know a victim of sexual assault.
  • 41% of Latin@s believe that fear of deportation is the number one barrier preventing Latin@ victims from seeking help, followed by fear of more violence for themselves and their families (39%) and fear of children being taken away (39%).
  • Lack of respect for the opposite sex was seen as a stronger driver of domestic violence and sexual assault than traditional gender roles.
  • Nearly two-thirds of Latin@s who knew a victim of domestic violence (61%) and sexual assault (60%) say that they intervened and did something for the victim.

“Debo aprender de lo que voy a hablar, porque muchas veces yo no puedo hablar algo que yo no conozco”

— RECENT IMMIGRANT LATINO, LOS ANGELES

When compared to the 2013 NO MORE Study, the NO MÁS data reveals that Latin@s are more likely than the population at large to take action to intervene and help prevent domestic violence and sexual assault. The NO MORE study, conducted by GfK Public Affairs and Corporate Communications, looked at attitudes of teens and adults on domestic violence and sexual assault in the population at large and was commissioned by the Avon Foundation for Women.

Key findings – 2015 NO MÁS Study and 2013 NO MORE Study comparison:

  • Latin@ parents are much more likely than parents in the U.S. population at large to talk to their children about domestic violence and sexual assault. More than half (54%) of Latin@ parents have talked to their children about these issues, compared to just 29% of  parents in the population at large who say they have talked to their children about domestic violence and/or sexual assault.
  • Over half (57%) of U.S. Latin@s report talking about domestic violence and sexual assault with their friends. In comparison, only 34% of the U.S. population at large say they have had a conversation about domestic violence and/or sexual assault with their friends.
  • Latin@s are more likely than the population at large to say they intervened and did something for the victim.

Review the Study’s Findings

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